Clockwork Scarab

November 14, 2014

Book Cover

When Mina Holmes, niece of Sherlock, and Evaline Stoker, sister of Bram, get called to the British Museum by Irene Stoker, they are in for a surprise. Young society girls in London are disappearing and dying, and they all have a connection – they all were in possession of a clockwork scarab before they died. Mina and Evaline are called to solve the mystery, and with Mina’s sleuthing capabilities and Evaline’s vampire slaying superpowers, what could possibly go wrong?

This book tried to do a lot of things, and it did none of them well.

Read the rest of this entry »


Love in the Time of Global Warming

November 7, 2014

Book Cover

Love in the Time of Global Warming follows the journey of a teenage girl in the apocalypse as she searches for her parents and little brother. On the way she embarks on an adventure similar to The Odyssey and falls in love.

I had so many issues with the book. My disappointment started when a teenage boy named Hex meets our hero, Pen, and says, “I love you. What’s your name?” Believe it or not, this is not the most ridiculous part.

Read the rest of this entry »


The Eye of Minds

October 31, 2014

Book Cover

The Eye of Minds is the first novel in the Morality Doctrine series. Our main character, Michael, is a gamer and likes to be on the VirNet with his friends. He’s not one for following the rules, which is fine. But one day, a hacker starts holding gamers hostage in the VirNet, which makes them brain dead. The government needs to stop this hacker, and they’re planning to use Michael to do it, but at what cost to Michael?

Since the Eye of Minds is written by the same author as the Maze Runner, which I love, I had high expectations for this book and my expectations were not failed.

Read the rest of this entry »


We’re Back!

October 21, 2014

readingcorpsrecs2014

Reading Corps is back in full swing, and we’ve been busy reading for the 2014 Teens Top Ten. Teens everywhere nominate their favorite books of last year, and then the list of 25 nominees is whittled down to the top ten books of that year. You can see the full list of nominees here.

Ok, here’s our top ten:

1: Openly Straight by Bill Konigsberg

2: Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell

3: Steelheart by Brandon Sanderson

4: The Testing by Joelle Charbonneau

5: Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea by April Tucholke

6: The 5th Wave by Rick Yancey

7: This Song Will Save Your Life by Leila Sales

8: The Girl Who Was Supposed to Die by April Henry

9: Winger by Andrew Smith

10: Splintered by A. G. Howard

Aaaaaand now for the official winners…

Read the rest of this entry »


Book Review: Epitaph Road by David Patneaude

September 5, 2014

I feel like this book could have been so much more than it was.

Epitaph Road

The story of Epitaph Road revolves around the generic, unlikable protagonist Kellen, a boy in a world with 95% women. While the book attempts to touch on deep philosophical, moral and sexist issues, you will find you never actually care. The characters are predictable and boring, and the plot is little more than an aimless romp through an uninteresting world. Every “twist” in the plot you will guess a whole 20 minutes beforehand, and there are many plot threads with absolutely no resolution. Furthermore, there is little to no characterization. Every time someone died, I was completely emotionless due to the characters being thoroughly unlikable. The author fails to make you care about the characters, and the book, which revolved around the characters, suffers greatly because of this. What could have been an interesting discussion about women ruling the world instead turns into one old lady’s quest to murder every man alive (no joke), and her motivation is absolutely non-existent.

In the end, Epitaph Road is a boring, unfocused dystopian novel that will leave you completely confused from beginning to end. Patneaude could have made a great addition to the dystopian literature field, but ended up making an embarrassing mess that few can enjoy. Only die-hard dystopian literature fans will take any measure of pleasure out of this.

Review by Jacob


Hush Hush by Becca Fitzpatrick

July 25, 2014

Hush, Hush is the story of Nora Gray, the friendly, smart, good-looking, intelligent, overall perfect human being who has one friend. That all changes when she is assigned an emo lab partner named Patch who actively tries to murder her.

This book needs to hush.

Of course, they start dating soon afterwards (I honestly wish I was making this up, but it gets worse). After that, she finds out Patch is a demon or a fallen angel, something the book never definitively provides enough detail to be sure of.

In all of its 400 pages, I never found myself caring about any of the other characters. The plot is an absolutely joke, with more than a few moments oddly similar to Twilight. And when I say a few moments, I mean pretty much the whole book. The only new stuff is change the word “vampire” to “demon” and add a murder plot. Even if you loved Twilight, you will find little of value here. From an obvious and boring plot to the over-the-top premise, this book should be avoided at all costs.

Review by Jacob


The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins

July 18, 2014

The book I’m reviewing is the Hunger Games. The plot of the Hunger Games centers around 12 districts who are forced every year to present a boy and girl from their district to fight in the the hunger games. The winner is the only survivor.

The Hunger Games leaves me hungry for more!

After reading the book, I knew exactly how I felt about it. The Hunger Games was so good at grabbing my attention. This book made me feel sad, mad, excited, scared, and relieved. I definitely loved the book because when I read it, I could never put it down. All in all, the Hunger Games was a great book, and I would recommend it to anyone!

Review by Julia


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 90 other followers

%d bloggers like this: